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The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth Workshop Summary by Research, and Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences

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Published by National Academies Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Gynaecology & obstetrics,
  • Neonatology,
  • Medical,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Gynecology & Obstetrics,
  • Perinatology & Neonatology,
  • Preventive Medicine,
  • Science / Environmental Science,
  • Environmental Engineering & Technology,
  • Health Care Delivery,
  • Congresses,
  • Environmental Health,
  • Environmental aspects,
  • Infants (Premature),
  • Labor, Premature,
  • Premature infants

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsDonald R. Mattison (Editor), Samuel Wilson (Editor), Christine Coussens (Editor), Dalia Gilbert (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages148
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10358796M
ISBN 100309090652
ISBN 109780309090650

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Download a PDF of "The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth" by the Institute of Medicine for free. Download a PDF of "The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth" by the Institute of Medicine for free. Copy the HTML code below to embed this book . Each year in the United States approximately , babies are born premature. These infants are at greater risk of death, and are more likely to suffer lifelong medical complications than full-term infants. Clinicians and researchers have made vast improvements in treating preterm birth; however, little success has been attained in understanding and preventing preterm by:   The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth Edited by Donald R. Mattison, Samuel Wilson, Christine Coussens, and Dalia Gilbert Washington, DC:National Academies Press, pp. ISBN: , $35 paper Preterm birth occurs frequently in most countries from which we have reliable statistics.   The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth: Workshop Summary [Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine, Gilbert, Dalia, Coussens, Christine, Wilson, Samuel, Mattison, Donald R.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth: Author: Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, and Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research.

Get this from a library! The role of environmental hazards in premature birth. [Donald R Mattison; Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine.; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.;] -- Each year in the United States approximately , babies are born premature. These infants are at greater risk of death, and are more. Get this from a library! The role of environmental hazards in premature birth: workshop summary. [Donald R Mattison; Institute of Medicine (U.S.). Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine.; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.;]. Premature Births and the Environment. More than a half million babies in the United States—1 of 8—are born prematurely each year. A baby is considered premature if he or she is born before the 37 th completed week of pregnancy. Being born premature, or early, is a serious health risk for a baby.   As stated in The Role of Environmental Health Hazards in Premature Birth, researchers believe that preterm birth is increasing in some countries, but the extent to which it is increasing is not known. It is of the utmost importance to find out whether preterm birth in fact is increasing, and the workshop participants presented in the book could.

birth (CDC, ). Consequently, 29% of IVF patients deliver twins, and another 2% give birth to triplets (CDC, ). Multiple births are associated with premature birth, low birth weight, and birth defects. Thus, specialists in reproductive medicine aim to reduce the frequency of multiple births (Jain, Missmer, & Hornstein, ). But armed with information, pregnant women and parents can take steps to limit their children’s exposure to environmental hazards and give them a healthy start in life. Two leading experts in the field of children’s environmental health separated reality from the myth about health hazards in every day life. The Role of Environmental Hazards in Premature Birth Edited by Donald R. Mattison, Samuel Wilson, Christine Coussens, and Dalia Gilbert Washington, DC:National Academies Press, pp. ISBN: , $35 paper Preterm birth occurs frequently in most countries from which we have reliable statistics. Prematurity—a birth that occurs. that environmental hazards can cause poorer health. Environmental hazards can increase human risk of illness, disability and premature death. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines risk as the “chance of harmful effects to human health or to ecological systems File Size: KB.